Power Crisis: Stakeholders Resolve to End Blame Game.

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Major stakeholders in the country’s power sector, yesterday, resolved to put the blame game behind and start appropriate action that will build robust synergy towards delivering improved electricity to the people. The one-day workshop, which was convened at the instance of the Market Operator, MO, of the Transmission Company of Nigeria, TCN, in Abuja, had in attendance, Transmission Services Provider, TSP; System Operator, SO; Market Operator, MO; Generation Company of Nigeria, GENCOs; Distribution Companies, DISCOs; Nigerian Electricity Regulatory Commission, NERC; Nigerian Bulk Electricity Trader, NBET, and other critical stakeholders.

In his opening remarks at the workshop, Managing Director of Transmission Company of Nigeria, TCN, Mr. Gur Mohammed, said the seminar was organised to resolve the issue of blame game that hitherto characterised the operations of the stakeholders in electricity value chains of the power sector. Mohammed, who was represented by Executive Director, Finance and Account at TCN, Mr. Sony Iruoche, however, agreed that more efforts should be put in to strengthen the operations of DISCOs. He said: “When you get the DISCOs networks right and everything perfectly in place, then you can recoup investments in the power sector. We have decided at this seminar to stop the blame game. There is a value chain in the system we have to maintain. Like I said in my speech, we are as strong as weakest part of the value chain.”

He noted that  the management of TCN had set up a committee to review the Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition, SCADA, for the company.  SCADA is an advance computerised system used in monitoring transmission line. According to him, “we have attempted to have SCADA during the time of Manitoba but that was a disaster. So, the management of TCN has embarked on SCADA , which will be funded by international development partners like World Bank.” In his address, Executive Director of Market Operator, Moshood Saleeman, described power as the most volatile commodity in the world. He said even in the developed countries, such as United Kingdom, China, etc, they still have their share of problems concerning supply of electric power to their citizenry.

Source: Vanguard

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